The Best Pitch Letter I've Ever Received

I recently received a letter from Dale Dixon, the author of a new public speaking book called Sweating Bullets: A Story about Overcoming the Fear of Public Speaking.

Until I received his note, which was accompanied by a copy of his book, Dale and I had never communicated. But the tone of his pitch letter was perfect—and a great example of the right way to pitch a stranger.

Dale Dixon Note Edited

1. He was familiar with my work

Any journalist or blogger can tell you stories about being pitched by PR professionals who had absolutely no familiarity with their product. I’ve been pitched to do stories on food, sports, and outdoor clothing.

Even people who are familiar with my work sometimes come across as perfunctory. But Dale didn’t. In his letter, he made a sincere effort to convey his familiarity with my coverage area. And as a result, I felt that he deserved my attention.  

2. His pitch looked good

Dale’s letterhead, which included an image of his book cover along with testimonials, looked good. His letter was professionally designed, attractively spaced, and uncluttered by an overabundance of words. Those may seem like small details—but in a business in which appearances matter, he made the most of his sheet of paper. As a result, he persuaded me to put his book toward the top of my “books to read” pile.

3. He made a soft pitch 

More than anything, I appreciated how subtle and respectful his pitch was. His motive for sending me the book—unless he’s the rare altruist—must be for me to read and review it. But in reading his letter, you’d never know it. He let the quality of his approach do the work for him and didn’t feel the need to deliver a blunt call to action. I found that understated approach rare and refreshing. As a result, I decided to reach out to him for permission to reprint his letter and help publicize his book.

I haven’t read Dale’s book yet, so I can’t offer a personal review of it. But if it’s anywhere as thoughtful as his perfect pitch, I’ll be in for a treat when I finally crack the spine.

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